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Sports Massage

About sports massage

Sports massage can be used to aid recovery from injury or an event or as part of a long term training programme. It is not just for elite athletes but the average club player as well.

Sports massage is a form of massage which focus on muscle systems used in athletic activities. It can combine Swedish style massage with trigger points compression and electro-neuromuscular techniques to reduce soreness and help enhance power, endurance and flexibility.

What happens during a sports massage?

Your sports massage therapist will talk to you about this during your consultation and will devise a programme most suitable for your body, your sport and the problems you need to address.

Your treatment may involve manual manipulation of your muscles and limbs, as well as the use of electrical stimuli to rejuvenate muscle or even ultrasound.

After your treatment

To gain maximum benefit from your sports massage treatment, try to rest afterwards – this helps your body’s natural healing process. Caffeine can have a stimulating effect, so tea, coffee and cola should be avoided if possible to help you relax.

Drink plenty of water or herbal tea over the next few days – this helps flush away toxins. Try to avoid alcohol and tobacco for at least 24hrs. If you have any queries, don’t hesitate to ask your therapist for advice. They will often advise on exercise to help or to avoid during training or rehabilitation.

Benefits of sports therapy

 

    • Relief from pain, e.g. back pain, stress and tension

 

    • Improved blood and lymph circulation

 

    • Increased energy levels and feelings of vitality

 

    • Injury recovery

 

    • A general sense of health and well-being

 

    • Removes scar tissue

 

    • Faster recovery from micro damage and trauma in workouts

 

    • Increased flexibility and range of motion

 

    • Relief from fatigue

 

    • Reduced injury healing time

 

    • Improved circulation

 

  • Reduced muscle tension, cramping and inflammation post event